Toronto wants people to stop eating coyotes.

After reporting that people were releasing animal feed at Colonel Samuel Smith Park in Attobike, Toronto residents want people to stop eating wild animals, especially coyotes.

A.D. By 2021, Toronto has received more than 3,600 views of Koyot in the city. Most coyote interactions are a direct result of the fact that people who give up animal feed have access to a regular source of food.

A statement from the city said, “Eating gum and wildlife will increase their survival and reduce fear, which will cause problems for wildlife and the environment.”

Although most coyotes do not pose a threat to humans, they can still pose a threat to pets.

“It is not uncommon for cats and dogs to be harmed or killed,” says the city. The Star has previously reported on the dangers of eating coyotes, and 10-year-old girl and Yorkshire Terrier reported that Koyot views in the city increased after they were chased by a coyote near Wardon Woods last summer.

It is common to see coyotes at this time of year.  Coyote breeding season occurs in January and February, so the animals are more active and can be seen near valleys and parks.

People living in green areas, valleys, and other areas of Koyotes should keep a close eye on their pets. Cats should be kept indoors and dogs should not be kept outside the designated area, the city recommends.

To reduce Koyot contacts, Toronto residents are advised not to leave any food outside, including pets.

“Coyotes are an integral part of the urban landscape in Toronto and an important part of ecology because they control rats and rabbits,” he said.

It is common to see coyotes at this time of year. Coyote breeding season occurs in January and February, which means the animals are more active and can be seen near valleys and parks.

If you encounter Koyot

It suggests that people in general should not approach Koyotes, their cave, or their child, even if they appear surprised, sick, or injured.

But she said that if you happen to be in the city, you can try to do the following to protect yourself and your pets.

Do not run. Avoid turning your back on it, keep an eye contact, and slowly pull back.

Make yourself look as big or as big as possible. Try to raise your hands in the air or open your jacket.

Make loud noises, try to tread, clap or use a trumpet or whistle. You can also try to grab plastic bags open and closed and shout at Koyot to warn other people nearby.

Be determined. Swing a walking stick, light a flashlight or, if available, throw a ball or pebble in the direction of Koyot to intimidate, the city said.

If your pet is infected with coyote

Attacks or bites on another animal will not be a cause for concern. If the city is injured or ill, the Toronto Veterinary Service will examine it and decide whether the Koyot can recover on its own or be taken to a wildlife sanctuary. Once recovered, the quilt returns to its original location.

People who eat or try to eat wild animals can be fined up to $ 365. The city wants to see 311 people who have seen someone eat koyot.

Koyote Views can be reported to Animalservices@toronto.ca by calling or emailing the Toronto Veterinary Service at 416-338-PAWS (7297).

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